How to Write a Book, Part 2

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There are two things you must love if you’re going to write a book. First, you have to love stories. And second, you have to love words.

I don’t think loving to express yourself is important or even useful. Good books are not primarily about the author (I’m talking about fiction — not autobiography). But even autobiography presumes an author having done something noteworthy.

Anyway, back to the point. A good story should get a reader out of himself and for that to happen, the author should get over himself. It’s not about you.

Morty

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6 Comments on “How to Write a Book, Part 2”

  1. xlinkx Says:

    I have tried to write a short story very many times. I can nail the introduction and get the reader into the story but when the body comes my story just falls apart. :-/ I will never stop trying though. Thanks for the advice.

  2. Mortimus Says:

    xlinkx,

    Here’s a thought for you. When I write a short story I begin with the end in mind. Then I develop my hook (the first few pages).

    Then it’s just a matter of connecting the dots — the beginning to the ending. When you have the end in mind the story can almost write itself!

    It’s still work — particularly re-writing (every author has to write several drafts of the story before he/she is done.)

    Morty

    Morty

  3. xlinkx Says:

    Your right I should brain storm the ending first. I will have to try that.

  4. supergirl717 Says:

    how do you write a story with a specific topic? in our writing class we ahve to write one where our character has a moment of “relization and maturity”…i need a little help

  5. Mortimus Says:

    supergirl717,

    Just a couple of thoughts.

    First, establish the immaturity. You need to describe this weakness but not make the character so unattractive so as to undermine sympathy by the reader.

    Second, the moment of realization should somehow make sense in the context of the character’s immaturity. For example — Trevor is struggling with fear, the moment of truth for him occurs when he stands up to the bullies. Things had happened to him to bring him to that point, though. It didn’t “just happen.”

    Morty

  6. supergirl717 Says:

    thanks Morty!!!i’m just a little lost doing it on my own…but it has helped alot 🙂
    thanks sooo much!!!

    *supergirl717*


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